Sunday, December 29, 2019

Selling your art? Mike Smith shares his views...

I hope this doesn’t turn out to be hubris, but I’ve had a good week of art sales. It reinforces, once again, that the phenomenon of online sales using social media platforms as connecting and marketing tools, far outweighs the value of the traditional gallery for us artists selling below the R10 000 price point. If you’re in this segment, you really should consider building your presence on FaceBook and on Instagram.


My other suggestions (remembering that I’m not a guru or a millionaire):

* Decide what ‘having an art career’ looks like for you. Is it one sale a month? Is it linked to an income figure, say R2k or R5k a month? Is it being able to totally live off proceeds of your art?

* Decide on your strategy. You probably need a mix of tactics to make up your strategy. Commissions, normal sales (off-the-easel kind of purchases where people buy what you make as part of your artistic practice), possibly design work (graphic, web, tattoo design) and mural work. Even teaching and offering workshops count imho.

* Think VERY carefully about pricing. You’re not going to reach Koons or Basquiat pricing, probably ever. In fact, here in SA, the five-figure mark (R10k and above) is elusive for many of us. Even gallery pricing can be misleading as a yardstick - remember, galleries are adding between 40 and 50%. Since you don’t need to do that to sell online or through FB, make your prices reasonable. My sense is that art is often an impulse purchase, and even middle-class South Africans only have around R2k-R3k to spend on an impulse purchase, before they start thinking more carefully.

* Price your work to go: meaning, it’s better, from a marketing- AND, crucially, a psychological point of view, to be moving work than to sit with tons of stock. Swallow your pride a little bit and remember you’re making objects to sell (if that’s your focus). Your objects are competing with a deluge of other objects: to participate in that market (again, if that’s your focus), you have to first have your objects floating out of your studio and into that deluge.

* Offer payment terms. With the numerous sales I made this year where I allowed people to pay off their works, only a couple proved to be problematic. Evaluating the risk of this tactic based on figures, I’ve realized it has definitely been more good than bad. Every business has a percentage of bad debt; again, swallow your pride and deal with risk.

* Quietly offer discounts. All the galleries do it. Don’t publicly undermine the value of your work, but if someone is on the fence about acquiring a work, offering them a private discount can be a great psychological sweetener. Remember, a sale is better than no sale.

* Once things are ticking over (and even R500 a month profit means you’re onto a good thing), work out how to grow your business. Consider how to operate more efficiently, upping your output and lowering your costs. But, also, test the waters on how to raise your prices. Dramatic price increases are a terrible idea. 10 - 20% a year is probably a good guide, but also only if your market will tolerate such an increase. Remember, your clients may be nice, and everyone likes to talk about supporting art and artists; but they don’t really care about your cost of living: they care about the cost-to-value ratio as it affects their own pockets. They’ll only pay as much as they believe something is worth to them to have.

These are things that have worked for me. I’d love to hear your suggestions and strategies in the comments.

Thank you for watching.

Friday, December 27, 2019

Andrew Wyeth - Painter of the People

One of the most renowned artists of modern times, Andrew Wyeth continues to hold the American public enthrall with his almost photographic quality paintings. Using watercolors and egg tempera to create masterpieces from the familiar people and landscapes that he grew up around, Wyeth has an unmistakable style that infuses emotion into the mundane. Often using shades of gray and brown, his work combines subdued colors with his mastery of shadows to create incredibly detailed portraits and landscapes.


Born in a small town in Pennsylvania called Chadds Ford, Andrew was the youngest child of five. In the third grade he suffered a bad case of whooping cough which left him sickly for much of his childhood. His parents decided to educate him at home at that time and so his father, Newell Convers (N.C.) Wyeth became his main teacher.

The elder Wyeth was a well known illustrator whose work was featured in many magazines and in other mediums so Andrew was exposed to art from an early age. Seeing the budding talent in young Andrew, his father taught him the basic concepts of drawing and Andrew began working in watercolors. He was to do many watercolor studies of the sea and shoreline while at the family's summer home in Port Clyde, Maine. His first exhibit was of these paintings in 1937.

The success of that first show in New York City launched a career spanning seventy years. By 1950, he was named in Time magazine as one of the greatest American artists. One of his works, "The Hunter", was featured in the Saturday Evening Post. Wyeth paintings hang in museums across the country including the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, MA., the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum of Modern Art. In 1987, his "Helga" collection was displayed in the National Gallery of Art - the first time they ever exhibited the works of a living artist.

Despite his popularity and many awards, Wyeth's work was and remains a controversial topic among critics. His representational style contrasted sharply with the abstract art that was favored during the twentieth century. Art critics have often said that his work is too close to illustration and too sentimental in flavor. While some critics describe him as a genius, others are hostile and derisive of his work. His most famous painting, "Christina's World", is even deliberately left out of the listings of masterworks for The Museum of Modern Art where the painting hangs.

Mark Traston is an associate with Portrait Painting. The company specializes in turning a photo to painting. Each portrait artist specializes in a specific area including wedding paintings, pet portraits, and executive portraits.

Article Source: https://EzineArticles.com/expert/Mark_Traston/187410

Friday, December 20, 2019

Choosing The Right Brushes For Oil Painting

Paint brushes come in a variety of shapes, sizes, materials, and costs. Determining which one is right for you, and when it is the right one, depends largely on how you want to use it. The main types of brushes are china bristle, soft hair, and synthetic bristle.


China Bristle Brushes

China bristle brushes, also called hog bristle or Chungking bristle, are made from natural pig hair. They are tough, durable brushes, able to stand up to the oil while still cleaning up nicely. They can hold a lot of paint, making them ideal for alla prima painting or impasto.

Soft Hair Brushes

Soft hair brushes are made from Kolinsky sable or ox hair, or more rarely squirrel, pony, goat, mongoose or badger. Soft hair brushes are much softer than china bristles, and a lot more expensive. It's not unheard of to pay several hundred dollars for a large sable brush. But for more delicate work, like blending and glazing, soft hair brushes are indispensable.

Synthetic Bristle Brushes

For quality and affordability, you can't go wrong with synthetic bristle brushes. Though turpentine or thinners used in oil painting can destroy some types of synthetic brushes, recent innovations in synthetic bristle technology have produced solvent resistant brushes.

Be careful, though. While affordability is a legitimate consideration when choosing your brushes, don't let it be the main one. Those brushes in the multi-packs may look just as good as the others, at a fraction of the cost, but you will end up with brushes warped and falling apart in no time.

Brush Shapes

Paint brushes come in several shapes, each designed to apply the paint in specific ways. The most useful shapes you will use in oil painting, in no particular order, are:

Flat - Designed to spread paint quickly and evenly to an area.
Bright - Similar to a flat brush, but with short, stiff bristles. Great for impasto work.
Round - Long, closely arranged bristles used for drawing or detail work.
Filbert - These almond-shaped brushes offer good coverage and the ability to perform some detail work
Fan Brush - Used for blending broad areas and creating different textures.
Liner Brush - Used for lettering and fine detail work.
By no means do you have to use, or even have, all of these brushes. Experiment and find the shape that works for you.
Brush Sizes
Brushes are sized by numbers based on the width of the brush at the metal sleeve, or ferrule, which holds the bristles in place. The size of your painting surface will help determine the size of the brush you use. For example, a brush that is 2 inches wide will be used on a canvas that is at least two or three feet in either direction.

However, this is just a rule of thumb. As with brush shapes, the sizes you choose will ultimately be determined by personal preference. So go get some brushes and start painting.

To learn more, please visit me at [http://www.oilandpigment.blogspot.com] for a look at my own paintings and works in progress.

Article Source: https://EzineArticles.com/expert/Rob_Pitts/88587

Friday, December 13, 2019

Five Most Common Problems Beginner Painters Have

For people who are interested in learning how to paint with either acrylic or oil paint may experience a few common learning problems. These are the most common problems people have when they are learning how to paint. You can overcome these common problems with some basic knowledge and problem solving skills that will eventually get you past these difficulties.


There are five common problems beginner painters have:

1. Very little experience in drawing prior to learning how to paint.

You really need to have some knowledge or experience in beginning drawing before you ever pick up a paint brush. Using a pencil to draw is a lot easier skill than using a paint brush. You should have some basic knowledge about shapes, forms, lines, and values (shading) to enable you to understand how to manipulate colors in your paint. You need to take your time and not hurry through your drawing in order to get the composition of your picture placed in the most effective way in your picture. If you can draw out the picture in a sketch book prior to actually drawing it on your canvas; this will help to iron out any problems that may arise with your composition. Having some skill and practice at the drawing level will definitely help you have a more successful painting.

2. Not being organized from the beginning with how you set up your palette.

When you first learn how to paint you need to be organized with all your paint colors from the beginning. That means to set out your paints on your palette in the same order every time. Try to leave the most room on your palette for mixing your colors. You will have to mix just about every color you use to paint with so you need to have room on your palette for these color mixtures. As a beginner, you will be using trial and error to get the color you want and this will take time and practice to learn which colors you need to mix together to get what you want. If you put your paints out all over your palette with no apparent order, you will not have any room for mixing and will end up having to clean off your palette and starting with a clean palette.

3. Not putting enough paint on your palette the first time.

Many beginner painters will squeeze out a tiny bit of paint on their palette and find that they run out of that particular color rather rapidly and need to get more from the tube again. This can be a problem when you are using that particular color to mix with to make another color with. Don't be stingy with the paint, it is OK to squeeze out a generous amount of paint onto the palette. The paint will stay moist for several days (especially if you put it in the refrigerator) You will use up the paint eventually.

4. Brush work problems of over-doing the brush strokes,

Another common problem beginner painters have is they repeatedly paint over the same area inadvertently ending up with mud. There is a tendency to keep on stroking the same area in the hope it will magically change into something they are trying to do. Unfortunately painting doesn't work that way. Each paint stroke needs to be thought out carefully and done in a way that will not interfere with the other colors. Some of the color do not go together well and this may be the cause of the "mud" in the end. It is very frustrating for the beginner painter to encounter this problem. It is a matter of learning the color theory and learning more skill at handling the paint brush. This comes with time and experience.

5. Forgetting to clean the paint brush frequently and especially between colors.

It is vital to clean your brush frequently while you are painting. Especially when changing to a different color. For a beginning painter it is very easy to forget to clean the brush and accidentally contaminate one of your lighter colors with a previous darker color you were using. This can happen either on the palette or on the canvas. If it happens on the canvas it can sometimes be difficult to fix the area, you may have to just wipe the area off and start again. Even if you don't clean your brush off in the turp solvent, you can still just wipe it off on a paper towel or a rag and that will help.


Article Source: https://EzineArticles.com/expert/Marilou_O'Loughlin/208858

Friday, December 6, 2019

Weekend Big Screen Feature: "The Secret of Drawing" Episode 4: "Drawing by Design"

Every weekend we feature a full length art movie / Documentary! So grab the popcorn and enjoy!

Acrylic Paint - Why It's So Great for Signs

Acrylic paint is a luminous synthetic paste that combines and enhances the best characteristics of watercolour and oil paint to create a versatile substance with superb coverage, drying power, flexibility and resistance. These important features in acrylic paint have been proven superior to other paints through careful testing.


Mexican painters of the 1920's conducted a series of pioneering tests on rudimentary acrylic paint to evaluate its resistance when exposed to harsh weather conditions. They discovered that its chemical properties gave it extreme durability. Small resin particles and pigment make up an emulsion in water held together by polymeric agglutinants. Unlike oil paint, water can evaporate out of acrylic from between the agglutinants. As a result the paste dries rapidly to form a compact plastic film.

Artist Jackson Pollock created large painted masterpieces with thick textures. This process is tedious when using oil paint due to the lengthy drying time. However, when Pollock used acrylic he no longer had to wait for months for his canvas to dry. Thus acrylic's superb drying power enabled artists such as Pollock to create more spontaneously. Abstract painter Morris Louise also benefited by exchanging oil for acrylic. Whereas in oil painting a primer must be applied to protect the canvas from eventual rot, this procedure was eliminated when Louis chose to use acrylic because of its self priming quality. Advantages such as these examples enable acrylic paint to be used as a fluid and economic medium.

Acrylic is exceptionally versatile and can be used in a broad variety of ways. It can be used in its common paste consistency, or watered down to create a colour wash. Other mediums can be added to modify the appearance or consistency of acrylic. A surface finish can be made either glossy or matt and an additional thickening medium allows thick paint layers to be shaped or brushed on, giving a sculptured texture.

Because of resins in acrylic a dried paint layer forms and remains flexible, allowing a greater variety of manipulation than is possible with the more brittle oil paint. Professional artists first experimented with acrylic's properties in the 1950's. Paintings from this time remain extremely fresh in comparison to similarly treated oil painting which have darkened or cracked. This durability has also been tested extensively by manufacturers. Paintings have been deliberately exposed to conditions which age the colours quickly. These tests show that acrylic is one of the most durable painting mediums available and will withstand the aging of centuries.

Due to its versatile features and outstanding quality, acrylic paint has proven the perfect medium for use in production of quality artwork that can withstand the outdoor environment.

Bernard Hibbs is a sign maker based in London. Clover Signs makes beautifully hand painted House Signs http://www.cloversigns.co.uk

Article Source: https://EzineArticles.com/expert/Bernard_Hibbs/111540

Sunday, November 24, 2019

Five Most Common Problems Beginner Painters Have

For people who are interested in learning how to paint with either acrylic or oil paint may experience a few common learning problems. These are the most common problems people have when they are learning how to paint. You can overcome these common problems with some basic knowledge and problem solving skills that will eventually get you past these difficulties.


There are five common problems beginner painters have:

1. Very little experience in drawing prior to learning how to paint.

You really need to have some knowledge or experience in beginning drawing before you ever pick up a paint brush. Using a pencil to draw is a lot easier skill than using a paint brush. You should have some basic knowledge about shapes, forms, lines, and values (shading) to enable you to understand how to manipulate colors in your paint. You need to take your time and not hurry through your drawing in order to get the composition of your picture placed in the most effective way in your picture. If you can draw out the picture in a sketch book prior to actually drawing it on your canvas; this will help to iron out any problems that may arise with your composition. Having some skill and practice at the drawing level will definitely help you have a more successful painting.

2. Not being organized from the beginning with how you set up your palette.

When you first learn how to paint you need to be organized with all your paint colors from the beginning. That means to set out your paints on your palette in the same order every time. Try to leave the most room on your palette for mixing your colors. You will have to mix just about every color you use to paint with so you need to have room on your palette for these color mixtures. As a beginner, you will be using trial and error to get the color you want and this will take time and practice to learn which colors you need to mix together to get what you want. If you put your paints out all over your palette with no apparent order, you will not have any room for mixing and will end up having to clean off your palette and starting with a clean palette.

3. Not putting enough paint on your palette the first time.

Many beginner painters will squeeze out a tiny bit of paint on their palette and find that they run out of that particular color rather rapidly and need to get more from the tube again. This can be a problem when you are using that particular color to mix with to make another color with. Don't be stingy with the paint, it is OK to squeeze out a generous amount of paint onto the palette. The paint will stay moist for several days (especially if you put it in the refrigerator) You will use up the paint eventually.

4. Brush work problems of over-doing the brush strokes,

Another common problem beginner painters have is they repeatedly paint over the same area inadvertently ending up with mud. There is a tendency to keep on stroking the same area in the hope it will magically change into something they are trying to do. Unfortunately painting doesn't work that way. Each paint stroke needs to be thought out carefully and done in a way that will not interfere with the other colors. Some of the color do not go together well and this may be the cause of the "mud" in the end. It is very frustrating for the beginner painter to encounter this problem. It is a matter of learning the color theory and learning more skill at handling the paint brush. This comes with time and experience.

5. Forgetting to clean the paint brush frequently and especially between colors.

It is vital to clean your brush frequently while you are painting. Especially when changing to a different color. For a beginning painter it is very easy to forget to clean the brush and accidentally contaminate one of your lighter colors with a previous darker color you were using. This can happen either on the palette or on the canvas. If it happens on the canvas it can sometimes be difficult to fix the area, you may have to just wipe the area off and start again. Even if you don't clean your brush off in the turp solvent, you can still just wipe it off on a paper towel or a rag and that will help.

For more information on learning how to paint with oil paints go to my website


Article Source: https://EzineArticles.com/expert/Marilou_O'Loughlin/208858

Friday, November 8, 2019

History of Oil Paintings

Oil Paintings are the stuffs of a certain time and certain set, and art history of course tries to place these works in their superior setting. Any body learning western art, for instance, would study to be familiar with the styles of the Oil painting reproduction, Baroque, traditional, idealistic and Modern periods, and to know the complex interaction of consideration, support, civilization and monetary issues, which the oil paintings represent. It is to such a sympathetic that art critics refer when they insist that art today has to be comprised with contemporary issues.


The history of oil painting goes back to very old times when man endeavored to detain his world and knowledge in paint. It was profound in the grottos of Southern Europe when man assorted animal fats with earth and stain to form what could be measured as the first oil paints. The paint was then altered onto the walls of the grotto, with the prehistoric images of the hunters and the animals sought after becoming the earliest creative creations of humankind.

The oil painting medium developed when during the time of 15th century, Jan van Eyck the well known Belgian painter found that linseed oil and oil from nuts can be mixed with different colors to generate dazzling oil colors. Though there is proof that some English artists from the 13th Century made use of oils, van Eyck leftovers the discoverer and first advocate of oil painting technique, as we know it these days. In modern times, oil painting color is one of the most in style choices of appearance by artists globally, as it offers enormous variety & methods, strong depth of color vitality and durability that allow paintings to last thousands of years.

It is as well one of the most lenient mediums - the paint could be simply directed on the canvas and if you make a error you could always clean the color off the canvas (only with a cloth dipped in turpentine), due to the length of ventilation time. The amazing flexibility of oil color provides itself completely to the customary painting techniques of joining together and glazing, impasto and scumbling on a huge number of surfaces, giving the artist excellent results. These days oil painting reproduction is gaining more and more popularity.

Vijay is a Copywriter of Art reproductions He written many articles in various topics. For more information visit: Oil painting contact him at 1artclubpainting@gmail.com

Article Source: https://EzineArticles.com/expert/Vijay_Kanth/42438

Friday, November 1, 2019

History of Western Paintings - The Ancient Near East

Palaeolithic people led an unsettled life; this nomadic society of hunters and gatherers has little control over their food supply. Beginning around 8000 B.C. however, people began to grow their own food, raise their own animals, and organise into permanent communities. Although, like their Palaeolithic predecessors, the Neolithic people (from neos, meaning "new" in Greek) used stone to make basic weapons and tolls, organised agriculture and animal husbandry left more time and labour for other activities, including the production of clay vessels. Since their size and weight made them difficult to carry, clay vessels are characteristic of stationary communities.


Neolithic villages made their first appearance in the Near East, an area consisting roughly of modern-day Turkey, Iraq and Iran. A late example of Neolithic painted pottery from this region is a beaker from Susa (present day Shush in Iran) dating to c. 4000 B.C. The highly abstracted animal forms contained within patterned borders are common to many works of art from this area. Decoration takes precedence over naturalism to create designs with beautiful stylised animals, such as the thin band of elongated dogs beneath a frieze of graceful long necked birds around the top of the beaker, and the marvellous ibex with circular horns, it's body composed of two curved triangles, that dominates the large central portion. In contrast with Palaeolithic depictions of animals, which may represent attempts to control the animal kingdom, animals, now domesticated, seem simply to decorate this Neolithic vase.

The Paleolithic peoples who created cave paintings were monadic hunters and gathers. Neolithic culture (New Stone Age), which first appeared in the Near East c. 8000 B.C. is characterised by settled villages, domesticated plants and aminals, and the crafts of pottery and weaving. The highly abstracted, stylised animals forms, representative of the "Animal Style", and patterns decorating this Neolithic beaker from Iran are commonly found in workds from the ancient Near East. An ibex (wild coat), with enlarged, circular horns and a body consisting of two curved triangles, decorates the centre of this vessel. The top band contains skinny, long-necked birds, and, directly below, a band of elongated dogs encircle the beaker.

The early Neolithic agricultural communities gradually evolved into more complex societies, with systems of government, law, formal religion, and, perhaps most importantly, the first appearance of writing, thus marking the end of prehistory and the beginning of recorded history. The political structures alternated between conglomerations of independently ruled city-states and centralised governments under a single leader.

The city-states of the Near East frequently fought one another. In addition, the lack of natural barriers made the area particularly vulnerable to invasion. This almost constant warfare was a frequent subject of art. A further destabilising factor was the unpredictable climate; floods, drought, storms, and the like plagued the inhabitants of this region. This, they understandably tended to worry considerably about survival in this world - a world of invasions, political instability and natural catastrophes.

From about the fourth millennium B.C. the Sumerians inhabited southern Mesopotamia, a Greek place name meaning "the land between the rivers", that is the Tigris and the Euphrates rivers. They invented the wheel and a form of writing in which a stylus, usually a length of reed cut at an angle, was used to impress characters on wet clay. Cuneiform, meaning "wedge shaped", which aptly describes the appearance of this writing, has been deciphered; our ability to read ancient Mesopotamian texts makes the ancient art of the region more accessible to the contemporary viewer than the art of prehistoric societies. Ancient near Eastern images usually have clearly structured compositions, ground-lines and readable narratives emphasising human beings, their history, and their relation to their gods and goddesses. All of these characteristics enable us to interpret the art more easily than the more elusive prehistoric cave paintings discussed earlier.

Neolithic village communities in the ancient Near East gradually developed into complex city-states, which were often politically unstable societies almost contstantly at war with east other and against invading peoples. War and victory are frequent subjects of ancient Near Eastern art. This image, an inlaid panel from the side of a box, may show an actual historical event, depicting the aftermath of war, with a victorious banquet scene in the top register. Historical narrative and a clear, formal composition distinguish this image from prehistoric cave paintings.

The various city states that comprised ancient Sumer were often at war with one another. The so called Standard of Ur is a box, the function of which is not known, that was found in a royal cemetery among daggers, helmets, and other military regalia. The box displays scenes of both war and peace, probably episodes of specific historical events. Stylistically, the depictions of human form in the Standard of Ur resemble those we will see in other ancient cultures. Frontal and profile views are combined in a single figure, emphasising the conceptual over the illusionistic, and the size of a figure directly corresponds to his importance; on the Standard of Ur, the seated, regal figure in the top row is bigger than this standing before him. Also typical is the arrangement of figures in the bands. There is little overlapping of forms, or any indication of a setting, resulting in a very two dimensional image. This straightforward, regimented presentation of figures contrasts markedly with the informal arrangement of imagery in prehistoric caves.
Priest Guiding a Sacrificial Bull

Among the most famous achievements of the Mesopotamians are the construction and decoration of the Ishtar Gate, originally one of the main entryways to the ancient city of Babylon (Iraq). Babylon had been the political and cultural capital of Mesopotamia under Hammurabi, and towards the end of the seventh century B.C. with the decline of the Assyrians - probably the most powerful people to dominate Mesopotamia and the surrounding regions - The Babylonians reasserted their power. The best known ruler of this Neo-Babylonian period was Nebuchadnezzar II (ruled 604-562 B.C.), the famed leader mentioned in the Old Testament who was responsible for building the Tower of Babel and the Hanging Gardens of Babylon, as well as the Ishtar Gate, now reassembled in Berlin. The Ishtar Gate and the walls lining the Processional Way (the street leading from the Gate) were faced with glazed brick. Sacred animals, also of glazed brick - among them, lions, associated with the Goddess Ishtar, and dragons, sacred to Marduk, the patron God of Babylon - and these geometric borders ornamented both the Gate and Processional Way. The somewhat stylized forms of these animals, and their rhythmic arrangement within the decorative borders, recall the Neolithic vase from Susa, with which we began our discussion of the art of the ancient Near East.

Colin Andrews is the Director of Aspect Art Ltd, an on-line exporter of the highest quality reproduction oil paintings, http://www.aspectart.com

Article Source: https://EzineArticles.com/expert/Colin_Andrews/143251

Friday, October 25, 2019

Popular Painting Styles

In painting world there are so many styles that are very popular. But before giving an account of different popular styles we need to know what the term "style" means. In fact, there is not any certain definition of "style". It may be understood in the aesthetic terms as what to paint or which physical technique implied in painting. Aesthetic movements like realism, romanticism and impressionism belong to this explanation of style. To further understand it, we may say that style is said to be the ways an artist paints and applies colors and texture. The perspective and the way in which an artist looks at the things visible and invisible characterize his or her style.


Scholarly discourse on style has given more technical term "movement" or "school" to which an artist can be associated with. Inclusion of an artist to certain school or movement may be done by the deliberate affiliation of the artist to such movement or by the art historians.

Some of the popular painting styles are discussed under following heads:

Constructivism: This movement had started in Russia in the wake of socialism. It was not purely an art but was a fusion of art and architecture. This movement was principal inspiration in raising many socialist establishments in Russia after the October revolution. Constructivism was on high in the period between 1919 to 1934. The chief proponents of this style of art were Alexander Rodcheckno, Liubov Popava, Vladimir Tatlin and Olga rozanova.

Fauvism: This is painting style in which proponents believed in the use of color as a massive emotional force. This style was marked by expression of feelings in colors with severe roughness and clumsiness. The use of simplified lines to expressively reveal the subject and theme of the painting was also used to be the attempt of the artists. They preferred spontaneity and freshness over the finish in any work of art. Pioneer of this art style was Gustave Moreau.

Classicism: This term refers to the paintings style employed by the ancient Roman and Greek painters. Classicism is characterized by the simplicity and adherence to the basic rules and principles. This art style is refined and elegant, disciplined by order and symmetry. Classicism is unique style which does not encourage self expression and individuality. Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael and Mantegna were the painters who tried to imitate this ancient style of art.

Besides, there are so many other styles and schools which are significant and have expressed different thoughts and subjects of the self and society in a unique way. Noteworthy of them are- abstract art, aboriginal art, aestheticism, art brut, art nouveau, baroque, Byzantine art, cubism, dada, dragging, encaustic, paintings, expressionism, gothic, impressionism, mannerism, marbling, minimalism, modernism, neoclassicism, orientalism, primitivism, ragging & stippling, realism, spattering, surrealism, symbolism, theorem paintings and wood graining.

Rajneesh Dubey is Content Coordinator for http://ethnicpaintings.com

This website gives you comprehensive informations on painting history, development, trends, popular painting styles, great painters, famous paintings, painting galleries and museums, painting tips, painting classes. In other words, this website is a treat to painting freaks.

To have more comprehensive idea about Popular Painting Styles please visit Ethnic Paintings

Article Source: https://EzineArticles.com/expert/Rajneesh_Dubey/126170

Friday, October 18, 2019

Female 20th Century German Expressionist Painter - Kathe Kollwitz

Born in 1867 to a father who was a radical social democrat who became a mason and house builder and educated by her grandfather on matters of religion and socialism Kathe Kollwitz dedicated her life to political activism. From an early age she was confronted by death when her younger brother died, leaving her deeply affected.


Her father's encouragement beginning at the age of 12 saw her progress artistically until she was old enough to go the Women's School of Art in Berlin, at a time when women were not allowed to study like men. At the age of 17 she got engaged to a medical student Karl Kollwitz whom she would not marry until 1891 when he was a qualified doctor. In the years in between she studied at Munich woman's art school, discovering there that she was a more talented draftsman than painter, then she returned to her home and rented a studio where she continued to draw Germany's working class laborers.

Two of her greatest works were The Weavers: an etching cycle inspired by the oppression of Silesian Weavers in Langembielau and their ultimately unsuccessful buy violent revolt in 1842, and The Peasant War: and etching cycle equally inspired by a violent revolution this time in southern Germany during the early years of the reformation when, in 1525, the peasants took arms against the feudal lords of the church who treated them as slaves.

During WWI she lost her one of her sons to the fighting and lost a grandson to WWII. All throughout her life she was a pacifist and produced anti-war art. She provided prints for the left-wing publications of pre-Nazi Germany and during the power struggle which followed the abdication of Kaiser Wilhelm II sought to ally the workers with the communist Soviets.

When the strongly anti-communist Nazis came to power they banned her from exhibiting and stripped her of her teaching post at the Berlin Academy of Art. Despite all this she stayed in Germany. She left Berlin in 1943, and during the latter days of the war her house was destroyed by an allied bomb, taking with it the majority of her work, all except a small portfolio she took with her.

In 1932 she finally finished her monument to the son she had lost in 1914: sculptures called The Grieving Parents. She was the first woman to be elected to the Prussian Academy of Arts. She died in 1945 in Moritzburg.

Works: The Weavers

Peasant War

Death and Woman

Death Woman and Child

Discover more of these artists and what they painted here:

http://www.squidoo.com/moonshine-art

Article Source: https://EzineArticles.com/expert/Kirsty_Semple/109534

Friday, October 11, 2019

German Expressionist Painter - George Grosz

As did many of the German artists of the time George Grosz fought in the trenches of WWI, having volunteered for military service. In 1915 he was discharged on medical grounds however he was drafted in the January of 1917 due to the shortage of soldiers, where he did not fight but guarded and transported prisoners of war, but by the May he was given permanent discharge as he was unfit for duty after a suicide attempt forced them to diagnose shell shock. Having faced his own disillusionment about the nature of war he turned his attention the bourgeoisies of 1920s Germany and painted a series of mocking caricatures of them and those who were in support of war.


He provided illustrations for German left-wing publications through his involvement with the German Dada group, and became a member of the KPD, the German communist party in 1919. He was arrested during the Spartacist uprising which marked the end of the German revolution, but he escaped using fake identification papers. In 1921 he was accused of insulting the army and was fined 300 German marks and had his work Gott Mit uns, God With Us - a satire condemning German Society - destroyed.

After spending five months in Russia meeting with people like Trotsky and Lenin he left the KPD, unwilling to live under any sort of dictator and as such his politics were strongly ant-Nazi. He was invited by the Art Studies League of New York to teach there in 1933, just at the time when the Nazis came to power. He received word that they had been to his apartment and his studio looking for him and so he stayed in America, becoming a naturalized citizen in 1938. During this time his work become more romantic and to many this signaled a decline.

He continued to teach, forming a private art school in his own home during the 1950s and he worked as an artist in residence. He was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1954. He returned to Berlin where he died after a fall down some stairs in 1959.

Works: Suicide 1916

Fit For Active Service 1918

Grey Day 1921

The Face of the Ruling Class 1921

The Eclipse of the Sun 1928

Discover more of these artists and what they painted here:

http://www.squidoo.com/moonshine-art

Article Source: https://EzineArticles.com/expert/Kirsty_Semple/109534

Sunday, October 6, 2019

“Be so good they can't ignore you”- Steve Martin

If you are good at something, and can afford to make a living from it, why do it for free? You have a talent or a skill; there are people willing to pay you for that skill, so why let go the opportunity of making money from it. I am not saying that we should be money freak; I am simply saying that you deserve to get paid as long as you are adding value to others. When you are so good at something, it becomes impossible for the world to ignore you.

In the superhero film, ‘The Dark Knight’, there is a line that is worth mentioning that I will like to refer to: "If you are good at something, never do it for free." I have always told people that your desire to do something for free should be out of conviction and not borne out of ignorance. Many people are doing things for free because they don’t really know the value of the service they are rendering. Some people are getting paid for services that they are not rendering well – I call this fraud! Many are being paid handsomely for services that are far inferior to yours. If you can offer this service well and get legitimately paid, why not?

On February 20, 2019, a Kaduna based young hyperrealism pencil artist, Eli Waduba, took to Twitter to share his latest art piece, a hyper-realistic painting of his favourite comedian, Kevin Hart. The young Nigerian artist who has gone unnoticed till then took it a step further to mention Kevin Hart in a tweet on February 22 hoping that it might be his breakthrough one way or the other. It did not take long for the popular comedian, actor and producer to take notice of the several mentions his name was getting for the amazing talent of the Nigerian man. With genuine interest and excitement, Kevin Hart took time to reply several tweets including that of Eli Waduba praising him for his great work. However, it did not end in praise, the impressed comedian took it a step further. He offered to purchase the piece and make a payment for 3 similar works of his friends. The tweet from Kevin Hart goes thus: “I see it and I want to purchase it...I also want to support you and your amazing talent by giving you a fee to do a pencil drawing of 3 of my celebrity friends that I can gift it to. DM your info and let’s get to work!”


The pertinent question I want to ask youths out there is this: Do you have anything that you are so good at that you can do for a fee? If you have, then that is your goldmine! Just like Eli Waduba, you must have something that you are so good at to open doors for you. Prepare for your breakthrough because when opportunity comes, it might be too late to prepare. Most of us have a hobby, a passion, or something that we love to do outside of our regular job. Very few of us ever thought we could turn this passion into a source of income. You may not want to give up your job, but the idea of sharing your passion can make for an extremely rewarding spare time activity, as well as give you some extra money on the side.

Your ability to exchange and leverage on what you love doing for money is the core essence of entrepreneurship. When you are constantly adding value to others without financial returns, then you are defrauding yourself! Many are simply poor because they are ignorant of how most of the things they do for free is linked to their wealth and financial freedom.

Many people are living in a manner that is unsustainable. When you give too much of yourself away for free, you deplete your ability to earn a sustainable income. The principle of wealth is simply exchanging ‘values’ for money. We are being paid simply because of the values we are adding to others. You deserve to be paid as long as you are adding values to others. Stop offering yourself for free, and except you are doing a volunteer work or humanitarian service, make sure you get paid whenever you add value to others! Stop letting your emotions or ‘excessive’ generosity gets in the way of living a sustainable and decent living.

The truth is that when too much of what you offer is for free, you make your service unsustainable. Transiting from the “Free Zone” to the “Fee Zone” is one of the core of sustainable entrepreneurship. Don’t stay in the “Free Zone” forever; monetize your service. It is not selfishness. One of the major reasons why people are so poor is simply because they give too much of themselves away for free! There is tremendous joy in earning income from doing something that you might happily do for free. Blogging was a hobby for Linda Ikeji, but today, she earns a fortune from it. Hobbies like photography, writing, cooking, baking, home or office organizing, interior decoration and event planning, graphic and web design, drawing and painting can be metamorphosed into money-spinning ventures. Walt Disney’s love for sketching and drawing created one of the most vast entertainment company now known as the Walt Disney Company. KFC (Kentucky Fried Chicken) was born out of someone’s hobby of cooking!

Whether as a full-fledged passion or a retirement plan, monetizing your hobby is the most sustainable way of living. Look inward and repackage what you love doing to make money. Making money from your hobby is not just only sustainable, it brings you deep satisfaction and excitation. Stop giving too much of yourself away for free; monetize the services you are very good at offering to others.

“If you do what you love, you’ll never work a day in your life”- Marc Anthony

Original article: Here

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Friday, October 4, 2019

Craig Banks discovers charcoal magic on canvas!

My experience with charcoal on canvas.

I'm one of those artists who hates to try new things as I foolishly and unrealistically expect any new attempt to instantly be on the same level as a medium I've spent 20 years to perfect. (pencil on paper is my all time one true love) The frustration of creating an artwork in a different medium and realising its way below my standard made me almost go crazy!


Then I decided to give charcoal on canvas a go.
Bottom line... It works!

With pencil on paper, my portraits are neat and tidy, soft and subtle but with charcoal on high quality canvas, my work ends up gritty yet intricate, smooth yet full of stark contrast and most importantly I am happy with the result and in time will be equal to my pencil offerings.

I am still learning. I still struggle... Especially with the finer details that pencil work is best suited for and being self taught for my entire art career I prefer to develop my own methods that fit with my unique style. Earbuds for example.. Smooths out any charcoal smudge like a dream!


Big thanks to my dealer Art Canvas Factory for supplying my canvas needs... You have made the struggle awesome!

Craig Banks FaceBook

Monday, September 30, 2019

A Rose Grows in Rehab - Using Watercolors as a Healing Tool

As a visual artist, I am always discovering ways that art can be used to enhance the lives of others. One of those ways is to aid in the healing of those mentally or physically ill.

My Tools

This year I started traveling with a small watercolor kit. The size of the kit is a "4x6" block. I also use the Strathmore blank post cards. The imperial watercolor paper works well for this kind of thing.

I went to a physical rehabilitation facility on a Monday evening equipped with these tools. The woman and friend I was visiting was in her seventies and recovering from surgery on her neck.
After we chatted for a while, I asked her if she would like a picture for her room. Her answer was a resounding YES. I should note that she already had an assortment of my prints in her home. Consequently, it was not a hard to convince her to allow me to paint.

My wife entertained her with a modern day version of a familiar bible story while I worked. I drew the rose first and completed it with the watercolors in her favorite color-Yellow. This enabled me to complete the work quickly.

When the rose was completed, this woman with hands still fighting for mobility reached out to touch the painting. Her face glowed as she looked with awe at her picture. I signed it and wrote a note of encouragement before I hung it where she could see it at all times.

Her roommate then begged me to paint a picture for her also. I did.


I am convinced, as many artists reading this will agree that artists must constantly work on their craft. Therefore, if you work on your art while visiting someone it can be a win-win situation.

Please know that I AM NOT SUGGESTING THAT YOU GIVE AWAY YOUR MASTERPIECES. However, believe that the person who is ill will see what ever you can contribute as a masterpiece. You will also be donating your time and healing concern. Isn't that what art is all about?

Lets all keep working to bring healing art to the world.

Ray Horner is a fine artist, inspirational speaker and art instructor

http://www.hornerartworkshop.com

Article Source: https://EzineArticles.com/expert/Raymond_Horner/63539

Friday, September 27, 2019

Oil Painting Techniques - The Many Ways to Apply Oil Paint

Oil paint is one of the most versatile and adaptable painting mediums in existence today. There are many techniques and effects possible with oil paint. Oil paint can be applied in thin transparent glazes or washes, or the paint can be mixed to a thick buttery consistency and applied using a painting knife. There really appears to be no end to the wonderful ways you can create art with this amazing painting medium. This article will talk about some of the many ways you can use oil paint.


Dry brush

The dry brush technique involves using a small amount of oil paint straight from the tube. It is then brushed thinly onto your support with a bristle brush. This technique works particularly well with a rough surface. The raised parts of your surface pick up the paint, while the dips or valleys in your support do not. This creates a broken color effect where the color of your canvas shows through.

Painting On A Toned Ground

The white of a canvas can sometimes be too bright or have too much contrast which makes starting a painting a bit difficult. When you cover your support with a uniform toned ground, it makes it much easier to judge the values in your painting. You can use any color you like to tone your ground really, but the more popular approach is to use warm tones of red, yellows and browns, which provide a wonderful richness to the finished work.

Here is an example of how to paint on a toned ground using Burnt Umber and Yellow Ochre. First you create the wash by mixing the Burnt Umber and Yellow Ochre together with a paint thinner (use turpentine, or if you are like me, and are allergic to turpentine, use a water soluble oil paint). Apply the mixture generously to your support and completely cover it with a large bristle brush. Let this mixture stand for a couple of minutes and then wipe off the excess wash with a cloth.

Alla Prima Painting

Alla Prima painting, also known as "direct painting", is a technique of oil painting where the work is usually finished in just one sitting. You are probably familiar with the artist Bob Ross, who made this painting method quite popular on his TV Show. I am sure like me, you watched Bob paint in amazement as he completed a beautiful painting in under 30 mintues.

The paint is applied wet onto wet directly onto the canvas usually with no underpainting or sketches. It might be a good idea in the beginning to lay down a sketch with some thinned down oil paint. This way you will have a general idea where your colors will be placed. You must be careful using this technique as your painting can become quite muddy if you do not apply the colors correctly on your canvas. It takes practice, so don't be discouraged if your first, second or even third painting does not come out the way you anticipated. Keep practicing and let your imagination run wild. As Bob used to say, "It's Your World".

Working With Painting Knives

If you have never worked with painting knives, then it is highly recommended that you give them a try. This type of painting method is very different from traditional brush painting and when you lay down your first stroke of paint with a painting knife, you will immediately see why. Painting with a knife can be best described as spreading butter on a piece of bread and you should keep your painting at a butter or cream like consistency when using painting knives. Do not use your palette knives to paint with. They have a different construction and are not made for painting. Painting knives have more flexibility to them and come in a variety of different shapes and sizes. You can manipulate paint in a variety of different ways with a knife just by changing your hand position on the handle. You can hold your hand down low on the handle to smear the paint over your support. Move your hand up to the top of the handle and you can use your finger to gently push the blade into the paint to create small dabs of color. You can also turn your knife blade on its side for scraping away paint or for creating hard lines.

Glazing

If you never produced a painting using the glazing technique, then you should definitely give this a try as well. Your painting will have a different appearance then if you were to complete a painting using traditional color mixing techniques. Glazing tends to give colors more luminescence. The colors are not mixed together first before applying, rather, they are mixed optically using single transparent layers of color. For instance, if you wanted to create the color green using glazes, you would not mix yellow and blue together on your palette first. You would first apply a thin glaze of blue, wait until it dries, then apply a thin glaze of yellow, which would then create your green. Each layer must be completely dry before applying subsequent layers. Usually, the first step in using the glazing technique is to create a monochromatic (different values of the same color) underpainting of the subject. Using only one color will help you to focus on form and tone first, rather than being too preoccupied with color at this stage. Wait until your under painting is dry to begin applying your first layer of color. This technique is tricky and does require practice, but it is not as difficult as some may lead you to believe.

For more oil painting lessons and techniques be sure to visit Creative Spotlite today, a free online community for artists and crafters. It is also recommended that you visit the Creative Spotlite Art Instruction Blog, where you will find more painting lessons including step by step painting videos.



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Monday, September 23, 2019

Isn't Watercolors Hard?

It seems that each time I show my watercolor paintings at shows or events, someone will say to me, "Watercolors are hard."

I smile and ask, "Why do you say that?"


THE MYTH : There is a myth circulating that painting with watercolors is difficult. Why? Is it because watercolors can become uncontrollable and people tend to want to be in control? Is it the effects of the medium? Or, what, I do not know? This myth continues to fascinate me and who knows, maybe, someday, I will have an answer.

THE TRUTH : Watercolor painting is not unlike other disciplines. Whenever a person undertakes a new experience there seems to be a "training period" where learning and skills are acquired. At this stage in the game, most people seek out an experienced person who they admire and who possesses that which they would like to emulate. This is true with any endeavor, so why not watercolor painting?

What makes watercolors different? What makes them so different is that you never know what will happen. Are you a person who likes surprises? Watercolors will surprise you each and every time you paint. A colleague of mine has a favorite saying which is "Let's see what will show up when I paint today." It is absolutely fascinating what water and pigment will do. To repeat an effect is challenging or not possible. Each time it is unique.

There are established techniques for watercolors as with any other art medium. These skills are helpful yet not necessary to express your self in watercolors. Many artists, and I believe everyone is an artist at heart, freely paint and allow what appears to tell them where to go or what to do next. Sometimes "what is" can be pleasing by itself. There are NO RULES! It is my belief that artistic expression lies in all of us and requires only a sense of trust and the freedom to allow the flowing for magic to happen.

A favorite way I freely express myself with watercolors is to paint Mandalas. Basically, painting within a circle, a mandala, creates a meditative state whereby a person freely paints anything they wish. In my experience sharing mandala painting with students, we have witnessed an array of all beautiful, unique mandala creations.

The one thing that sets watercolors apart from other painting media is that it is a spontaneous method. First impressions are vital. You cannot go back and change it, or rarely. This might be a little intimidating to people, yet it can be very refreshing, too. I have found that my favorite paintings have had this light, first impression touch which magically flows, no effort. It is just there.

Not every piece is a masterpiece. Of course, there is always more paper. I must admit that I have turned less successful paintings into new paintings with collage. Watercolor paintings are full of happy accidents. You will never know what to expect and this is the nature of watercolors and most likely fuels the myth.

ARTISTIC EXPRESSION: The fun of creating is what it we are all about, right? It is our connection with our soul. I feel as if I learn everyday when I sit down to create a watercolor painting. Watercolors change, I change, the subjects change. People tend to avoid change because it requires letting go of external layers of beliefs. Maybe the myth is true that watercolors are difficult, what do you think?

Joanne Osband is an accomplished artist and registered art therapist who is a kind and masterful guide for assisting others to discover the gifts that live within us.

http://www.ColoringOutOfTheLines.com

Article Source: https://EzineArticles.com/expert/Joanne_Osband/102601



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Sunday, September 22, 2019

Acrylic Painting Techniques

The acrylic painting medium is a fairly new addition to the various painting mediums available to today's artists. It has been around since the 1950's and has been continually under development and refinement ever since.

Acrylic paint is highly favored amongst artists because of its wonderful versatility. It can be applied thickly as an impasto having rich texture or in washes mimicking the characteristics of watercolor.

Another likable characteristic of acrylic paint is its permanence. Acrylic paint is not susceptible to yellowing or hardening with age. With acrylic paint, the artist does not need to be concerned with the order the paint is applied or other special techniques that ensure the paint film remains free from cracking. So it can be said that acrylic paint is much easier to use than oil paint.

Yet another characteristic that invites new artists to this medium is its fast drying time. Since acrylic paint dries so quickly, colors can be applied and overlaid quicker than with oil painting.

There are however a few downsides to the quick drying time of acrylic paints:

1) The paint will not remain workable for very long, so you have to work quickly.

2) The fast drying time of acrylics can also ruin brushes if the brushes are not cleaned immediately.

3) Acrylic paint is not the best medium for direct painting outdoors, especially on a bright sunny day. Whatever paint you put out on your palette will begin to dry quickly and form a skin over the surface of the paint making it very difficult to work with.


Watercolor Effects

Acrylic paint works wonderfully as a transparent medium, similar to watercolor. Acrylics do have an advantage over watercolors. You can lay out a number of thin washes over one another without fear of disturbing the colors underneath. You must wait for one layer to dry completely before applying another of course. Once each layer dries it becomes insoluble in water. The only disadvantage to using acrylics as a watercolor medium is the difficulty in modifying the color. Once acrylic paint begins to dry it becomes rather difficult to work with. One of the biggest problems is the tendency for washes to dry with unwanted hard edges. You can avoid this problem in one of two ways. You can either dampen the paper before the paint is applied or you can use an additional brush dampened with water. Use one brush to apply the paint and immediately soften the edge with the other brush that has been dampened with the water.

Blending Opaque Colors

With watercolor effects, the acrylic paint is applied in transparent washes. With the opaque technique the paint layers are non-transparent. Blending opaque acrylic colors can be a bit tricky as you are kind of pressed for time. It is important therefore to only work on areas that you know you will have enough time to blend. To blend two colors, first paint a block of each color side by side on your support. Where the two colors join paint down that line with a clean damp brush to soften the edges. To blend the colors even further, move the blending brush from side to side or up and down, until the desired blending is achieved.

Sgraffito Technique

Sgraffito is a scratching technique. It got its name from the Italian word graffiare which literally means to scratch. Just as the name implies it involves scratching into the surface of the wet paint which reveals either the ground or layer of dry color underneath. There are a number of different tools that can be used for this technique. Tools like screwdrivers or the sharpened end of an old paintbrush handle should suffice. It really depends on the support you are using. For instance, a screwdriver may not be the best tool if you are using a panel as a support. The hard metal may damage the panel, so you would need to use a softer tool.

Using a Squeegee

A regular squeegee that you can purchase at any hardware or auto store can create some interesting effects when used with acrylic paint. First you would squeeze out some paint blobs directly along one edge of your support. You can layout whatever colors you wish. Then with one fluid motion you would drag the paint across the support with your squeegee, which will smear and mix the paint and create some very unique and interesting designs. You may need to alter your squeegee a bit as the rubber blade that comes with most squeegees may not be rigid enough to drag the paint. You can remove the rubber blade and in its place glue in a regular wooden ruler. This will give you a flat sturdy edge to manipulate the paint.

I hope you have enjoyed this article on acrylic painting techniques. Take some time today to experiment with these techniques and have fun. Happy Painting!

Ralph Serpe is webmaster and founder of Creative Spotlite, a free arts and crafts community. For more free art lessons like this, visit: http://www.creativespotlite.com today. Visit our blog, http://www.artinstructionblog.com as well for even more free art instruction.

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Sunday, September 15, 2019

Jack Vettriano Prints - The Painter of the Singing Butler

Beginnings

From very humble beginnings, Jack Vettriano has risen to become one of the most successful living artists. Born as Jack Hoggan in 1941 in Fife, Scotland, he grew up in an industrial landscape. Like most of his peers, he left school aged 16 and entered the coal mining industry as an apprentice mining engineer. It was some years before he began exploring the artistic talents which have given him world renown.

INSTAGRAM

His earliest paintings were copies of impressionist paintings but, in 1998 he submitted two canvases to the Royal Scottish Academy to be shown in their annual show. This marked a breakthrough in commercial terms for Vettriano as both paintings sold on the first day of the exhibition and, crucially, he was approached by other galleries who wanted to sell his output.

Other commercially successful exhibitions followed in places around the world including Edinburgh, London, Hong Kong, Johannesburg, and New York.

Jack Vettriano prints: $1m

Many art critics dismiss Vettriano's work as 'vulgar' and 'devoid of imagination'. This criticism doesn't seem to affect the sales of his work though. According to the daily UK newspaper, The Guardian, he earns £500,000 (around $1,000,000) a year in print royalties alone. Maybe his prints are so highly valued because they are very romantic and evocative of a bygone, more elegant age.

Singing Butler and Others

The Singing Butler, his most famous work, which romantically shows an elegant couple dancing on a beach attended by what seems to be a maid and a butler sells more posters and postcards than any other painting in the UK.

Billy Boys is another iconic Vettriano painting that crops up in print form in lots of stylish locations. Once again, it's a beach scene which shows four immaculately dressed young men strolling along the shoreline.

Almost Turneresque is the hugely romantic 'Dance Me To The End Of Love' which shows three couples, once again, elegantly dressed, dancing through a misty haze.

INSTAGRAM

Celebrity Client List

Vettriano has studios in Scotland and London. He is represented by the Portland Gallery, London and includes Jack Nicholson and Terence Conran amongst his collectors. In 2003 he was awarded the OBE.

Now it's easy to join the Celebrity Set and own your own copy of one of Vettriano's iconic and stylish paintings. Get the best deals on Jack Vettriano prints.

Article Source: https://EzineArticles.com/expert/Mark_Byrne/90380



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Friday, September 6, 2019

Acrylic Paints are Different From Oil Painting

Acrylic paint comes in a tube, just like oil paint. However, since acrylic paint is water-based meaning it dissolves in water instead of oil-based meaning you need to dissolve it in oil or turpentine, it's much easier to clean up after. You can soak your brushes and clean your hands in plain tap water, instead of smelly and flammable chemicals.
Another advantage to acrylic paint is that it dries much faster than oil paint usually
overnight. If you're working on a painting that needs to be done on time, that's
important. Acrylic paint was developed as a water-based alternative to traditional oil
paints.

Acrylic paints can be diluted with water, but become water-resistant when dry.
Depending on how much the paint is diluted with water, the finished painting can
resemble a watercolor or an oil painting.

Acrylic paint is a fast-drying paint containing pigment suspended in an acrylic polymer
resin. Different from oil painting as watercolor is different from oil painting. There are
techniques, which are available only to acrylic painters, and there are also restrictions,
which are unique to acrylic painting.

Acrylic paints can achieve an oil-paint-like effect, and do so in much less time. Applied
to look like oil paints, acrylics are somewhat limited due to the superior color range of
oil paints, and the fact that acrylic dry to a shiny, smooth.

Acrylics paints are sometimes used in place of watercolors because acrylics dry closer
to the desired color slightly darker, usually, while watercolors dry lighter and often
unpredictably, especially for beginning artists.

Roger King has been writing articles on decorative interior painting for several years, and has been helping people find and review the best value for interior painting solutions.

Visit his web site www.decorativeinteriorpainting.com for free tips and guides for your next painting project

Article Source: https://EzineArticles.com/expert/Roger_King/20900



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Wednesday, September 4, 2019

Affordable Paintings: Art Prints Buying Guide

The fastest way to bring beauty and style to a
room is to put up prints of beautiful paintings. Here's what you
should consider:
Painting Prints Price Range:

Expect
to pay somewhere in the neighborhood of $50-$500 for an unframed
print--anything less than $50 is likely a poster. You should
expect to pay a similar amount to have the print framed--note that many
prints are designed to be exhibited without frames.

Before
art prints were sold online, the only way to get them was through
galleries or museum shops, which had to charge a large markup.
Nowadays, art prints rarely cost more than a few hundred dollars, and
it is possible to find good-quality prints for under $100. Still,
those lower prices generally come on prints that have been put on
sale. Expect to pay more for perennial favorites like Van Gogh's
"Starry Night".

Selection

There
is at least one print of every painting or photograph on display in a
museum anywhere. Thanks to the internet, you can find the right
art print among the tens of thousands in existence and have it sent to
you, regardless of where the original is located. Since websites
will let you browse thumbnail images of the artwork, it's easy to find
a particular piece even if all you know about it is the name of the
artist or even just the time period in which it was created.

Painting Print Media

Prints are available in a variety of print stocks.

Prints vs. Original Paintings

If
all you're interested in is a picture to decorate your wall, rather
than in collecting, prints are a better value than original
paintings. Here's why:

* Expense.
Creating an original work of art generally takes weeks. If you
had to employ someone for several weeks or several months, how much do
you think it would cost at even a modest salary? That's why
original artwork generally costs at least thousands of dollars.
In order to have a real chance of your work of art having investment
value, you need to buy the work of an artist who is moving up in the
art market.

* Questionable
investment value. Original artwork only has investment value if
the price goes up eventually. Very often, the price does
not. In short, if you're interested in investing, buy
stocks--it's a safer bet. Only buy art because *you* value it.

* Knowledge.
You need to be very knowledgeable about what you are doing. Make
no mistake: there's plenty of fraud in this business. There is
also plenty of wishful thinking on the part of art dealers when it
comes to a work's long-term market prospects

Ready
to make your home more beautiful with prints of great paintings?
You're already in the right place: the internet has numerous websites
offering an unbelievable array of art prints. Start looking now.

Joel Walsh has written a buying guide for art prints at: paintings [http://www.a1-paintings.com]:[http://www.a1-paintings.com]

Article Source: https://EzineArticles.com/expert/Joel_Walsh/6972



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Wednesday, August 28, 2019

Vietnamese Painting - Brushing Excellence On Canvas

There is nothing more beautiful than an artwork that stimulates aesthetic pleasure. Such aesthetic experience acts as a catalyst to enhance our happiness. Earlier, the classical works of art drew heavily from nature's beauty. But of late, modern art work chiefly draws inspiration from the mundane life of man. In other words, modern art captures both material and the spiritual on an equal plane. This trend of depicting the various aspects of human life is clearly evident in the paintings of Vietnam.

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From a historical perspective, Vietnamese painting is not a very old art form. It's been only seventy years since the first official art academy of Hanoi, the Ecole de Beaux Arts, opened its doors to local students. However, the cultural origin of Vietnamese painting dates back much further. There has been a consistent effort on part of the Vietnamese people to devote themselves in serious artwork. When the first lessons in line, drawing, anatomy and landscape painting were offered in the early decades of the twentieth century, the art students began taking inspiration from the religious and cultural background of Vietnam. These new learners of art sketched their native villages and fellow farmers in the canvas following the lacquer and silk traditions. During the French colonial period, the students of art took to painting readily as they already possessed the materials needed to create a painting. Once the means to convey their artwork was secured, the new generation of painters began to produce an amazing variety of exquisite paintings. The vision of the past has changed but even today, artists of Vietnam keep on drawing inspiration from the past.

Connoisseurs of art, especially from the West, often complain of the deep influence of Europe in Vietnamese paintings. However, it is surprising to note that modern Vietnam artists still prefer to paint in the age of digital images and multimedia! Yet, if we analyze closely the environment in which the Vietnam artists live and work, we would conclude that painting suits the sensibilities of the Vietnamese artists as it incorporates the century-old cultural and religious motifs of the people. Besides, this expression of art is most immediately available to them. The European touch in Vietnamese painting is by no means accidental, but deliberate. A majority of Vietnamese painters love and appreciate the Western art and hence try to apply some of their techniques in their paintings so that the world would look up to them and give equal weightage to Vietnamese art. The West has not inspired the subject matter of Vietnamese paintings; rather the latter conveys the intricacies of the cultural and social life of Vietnam. Vietnamese artists, like other artists of the world, are moved by their environment and have taken recourse to a delicate way to voice their sentiments through color and poetic imagery.

For a great many years, Vietnamese painters struggled to give free rein to their expression on canvas. Lack of opportunities and adequate funds had created great obstacles to the success and recognition of Vietnam painting. Scarcity of information from the West set their imagination free and Vietnamese art thrived with luxuriance. Overcoming all these obstacles, the Vietnam artists showed their skill to paint under any adverse circumstances. Their resilience and determination are clearly mirrored in the originality and freshness of Vietnamese paintings.

Suzanne Macguire is an Internet marketing professional with expertise in content development and technical writing in a variety of industries.

Vietnamese Fine Art

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